Clearing the Silverlight Isolated Storage cache

September 29, 2011 at 5:34 pm Leave a comment

Today I was trying to configure a new storage account for a Windows Azure application but in the middle of the process my Internet connection was lost and the next time I tried to enter the Storage Account menu in the Management Portal I got and unhandled application error.

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I closed Internet Explorer, opened it and tried to do the same operation again and the error message kept showing on. Suspecting this was an issue with the Internet Explorer cache I cleared it but the error remained.

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Any other website displayed ok so to identify if this problem was related to that specific Internet Explorer installation I tried from another laptop and to my surprise the Management Portal opened ok.

So if the problem was only with Windows Azure Management Portal and it only happened in an specific installation of Internet Explorer y suspected something in the cache of that computer was corrupted. It couldn’t be the Internet Explorer cache because I had cleaned it and the problem remained in place. That’s when I turned my attention to Silverlight’s Isolated Storage. This sort of cache is used by the product to enable applications running on it to store small amounts of data needed for their proper operation.

The question now was, where is this storage located? Well, it for sure is not located in the classic Internet Explorer temporary folder but in the following path:

<SYSTEMDRIVE>\Users\<user>\AppData\LocalLow\Microsoft\Silverlight\is

Now I had all the information I needed, I deleted all the contents of the is folder, restarted Internet Explorer and upon confirming the classical Isolated Storage Quota increase confirmation windows I was able to access the Management Portal again with no error at all.

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If you want to know more about Silverlight Isolated Storage you can read this great article by Justin Van Patten in MSDN Magazine.

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Entry filed under: Silverlight, Windows Azure. Tags: , .

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